Collagen

Collagen is a type of protein. It is, in fact, the most abundant structural protein in animals. A structural protein is one that forms the framework or structure of your cells and tissues (1Trusted Source).

There are 28 known types of collagen, with type I collagen accounting for 90% of the collagen in the human body (2Trusted Source).

Collagen is composed mainly of the amino acids glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline. These amino acids combine to form three strands that make up the triple-helix structure that is characteristic of collagen (3Trusted Source).

Collagen can be found in connective tissue, skin, tendons, bones, and cartilage, among other places. It gives tissues structural support and is involved in many cellular processes, including

Tissue repair
Immune response
Cellular communication
Cellular migration, a process necessary for tissue

Connective tissue cells called fibroblasts produce and maintain collagen. As people age, their collagen becomes fragmented, their fibroblast function deteriorates, and their collagen production slows.

These changes, combined with the loss of another key structural protein known as elastin, result in ageing symptoms such as sagging skin and wrinkles.

Uses for Collagen

Your body produces collagen naturally, and you can get it from foods like chicken skin and fish skin, as well as collagen supplements.

Oral and topical collagen products, such as supplements and face creams, are popular for treating ageing symptoms such as wrinkles, skin hydration loss, and joint pain.

Collagen is available in powder, capsule, and liquid form.

You can take it as a supplement or add it to beverages Connective tissue cells called fibroblasts produce and maintain collagen. As people age, their collagen becomes fragmented, their fibroblast function deteriorates, and their collagen production slows.

These changes, combined with the loss of another key structural protein known as elastin, result in ageing symptoms such as sagging skin and wrinkles.

 

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